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Here's Why You Should Be Hiring Diverse Talent

March 20, 2019

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by Angela Bourassa


We are at an interesting point in our country's history; a point where women, people of color, people with disabilities, and the LGBTQ+ community are getting a real platform for the first time. In the workforce, executives and boards are starting to not just accept but embrace the principle that hiring diverse talent creates greater success at every level -- including the bottom line.

Companies that make a conscious effort to seek out diverse talent don't always have an easy task ahead of them. The tried-and-true method of hiring top grads from top schools sounds appealing, but when those grads come from the same privileged backgrounds and all had the same academic experience and share the same basic interests and career goals and have the same cultural touchstones, that homogeneity will ultimately lead to stagnation.

When different viewpoints, life experiences, interests, and passions are brought into the mix, the conversation shifts. People learn from one another. Doors are opened. Creativity blossoms. Productivity soars. And toxic workplace behaviors -- such as discrimination and sexual harassment -- decrease.

Consider the facts:

  • Research out of the Harvard Business Review shows that workplace cultures that promote diversity help everyone -- not just "diverse" employees -- feel more included, which contributes to a 60% improvement in decision-making.

  • A recent Glassdoor survey found that two-thirds of top candidates consider the diversity of a company to be an important factor when weighing a job offer.

  • A study by the Boston Consulting Group looked at 1700 companies across eight countries and found that companies with more diverse management teams produced 19% higher revenues. The study attributed the difference to greater innovation.

The Leaders of Tomorrow are at Make School

A core tenant of Make School's philosophy is the belief that where you were born, how much money your parents make, and even your high school grades are not the best indicators of potential. We look for students with grit, critical thinking ability, and a passion for building a better tomorrow. That philosophy has helped us attract some of the brightest minds from around the world.

As The Make School Vision statement asserts, a foundational pillar of Make School is "To create avenues of upward mobility for students of all backgrounds, empowering such students to contribute to society through science and technology innovation."

  • A full 50% of Make School students come from households that earn less than $60,000 per year.

  • 45% of Make School students are underrepresented students of color.

On the whole, the tech industry still has a long way to go when it comes to diversity. One study found that the tech industry, by percentage, employs half as many Black and Latinx people as the private sector at large. Another found that 83% of executives in tech are white.

And another found that diversity initiatives could net the tech industry an additional $400 billion per year.

Meet Your Next Great Hire at Make School

If your growing tech company or tiny startup is looking for the best talent -- talent with diverse experiences, ideas, values, and passions -- we invite you to connect with us at jeff@makeschool.com.

We look forward to introducing you to the array of unique and talented young developers here at Make School.


Make School is a two-year computer science college based in San Francisco that offers a Bachelor's degree in Applied Computer Science. The focus of Make School is providing product-based learning that prepares students for real-world careers in software development. Students graduate with an average salary of $95k.

Learn more about Make School's philosophy, courses, and outcomes at https://www.makeschool.com/computer-science.

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